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Mr. Moon and his chickens on his farm.

Mr. Moon and his chickens on his farm. Photo courtesy of Thomas Osborne.

Safeway is taking a step in the right direction with its certification requirements for humanely produced eggs (see this Seattle Times article). But we’ll continue to buy our eggs from John Moon, an eightysomething farmer in Terrebonne, OR who produces free-range eggs, honey and vegetables on his farm near us.

Here in the Northwest, we love salmon and work to protect our salmon runs. Wild salmon could potentially be threatened if GMO farmed fish escape, not to mention the unknown effects on human health. The possible benefit of somewhat cheaper salmon is not worth the enormous risk. Sign this petition to let the FDA know you won’t eat genetically modified fish.

Lots of communities have restrictions on what homeowners can do. Our rural neighborhood bans poultry. In the town where I grew up, you can’t park an RV in your driveway. One homeowners’ association in nearby Bend, OR bars residents from hanging laundry to dry outdoors.
But Orlando’s law against having a sustainable vegetable garden in your front yard, reported in this interesting story in the New York Times, is the epitome of stupidity!

If you have any doubt that the investment of a little extra time to cook your holiday dinner fresh from scratch is worth the effort, check out this side-by-side taste test judged by a group of firefighters.

You don’t have to live in the High Desert to know that conserving water is a good thing, but it is especially important in this arid climate. I was glad to see recently crews working on replacing some street median plantings in Bend OR with native plants and rock mulch. At my own place I continue to work on crafting an attractive landscape with native and other drought-tolerant plants, and I see more and more homeowners adopting the principles of xeriscaping too.
If you have a good-looking landscape that uses drip irrigation, or native/drought-tolerant plantings, or greatly limits turfgrass, enter this photo contest. You could inspire others to do likewise.

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